B.A. in American Sign Language (2022)

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American Sign Language

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B.A. in American Sign Language

American Sign Language

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Courses & Requirements

Summary of Requirements

2022-2023
Core Curriculum 43
Pre-Major Courses 9
Major and Related Courses 51
Free Elective Courses 17
TOTAL 120

Required pre-major courses 9 hours

This course covers areas of vocabulary, semantics, grammar and organization of ASL and English. Students look at the linguistic aspects of both languages and compare the two. The class also covers word classes and sentence structure of both languages. To assist students in understanding the structure of both languages, discussion of how languages work is included.

(Video) How To Sign In BASL (Black American Sign Language) | Strong Black Lead

Visual media has changed the way we work with American Sign Language. With the advent of new tools and platforms, possibilities of publishing have proliferated, allowing a wider discourse of ideas to be shared with a vast audience of people who work with ASL and ASL learners. This course explores these opportunities through a hands-on approach and introduces students to the tools and skills necessary to produce digital video, websites, interactive presentations and social media and integrate those with the field of ASL.

An introduction to the major features of languages and to the structure, use, and variation in the sign languages and sign systems commonly used in the United States. The course will cover four major topics: (1) Language: The nature and definition of languages, the uniqueness of language, and contrasts between language and other forms of communication; (2) Language and Culture: The role of language in human society, with special focus on language acquisition, language identity, and bilingualism; (3) American Sign Language Structure: A survey of the major features of the linguistic structure of ASL. Topics are: Phonology: the structure of the physical signals; Morphology: the basic structure and composition of meaningful units of ASL; Syntax: word order and nonmanual syntactic signals in ASL sentences; (4) Language Variation: Language variation and language contact in the deaf community, including discussions of contact varieties of signing and systems for representing English.

Required major courses 48 hours

This course is designed to expose students to the variety of features in ASL by recognizing and considering the ways those features are demonstrated in naturalistic data. Students will compile a collection of data sets, which will allow them to investigate ASL features. Critical analysis of ASL features including ASL fingerspelling, sentence types, and non-manual aspects of the language reinforces students' abilities in creating, utilizing, and analyzing ASL materials for the purpose of academic research, pedagogy, and resources.

This course is designed to continue students' exposure to the variety of features in ASL by recognizing and considering the ways those features are demonstrated in naturalistic data. Students will compile a collection of data sets, which will allow them to investigate ASL features. Critical analysis of ASL features including ASL depiction, discourse features, and ASL registers reinforces students' abilities in creating, utilizing, and analyzing ASL materials for the purpose of academic research, pedagogy, and resources.

This course provides an overview of various genres in American Sign Language Narratives ranging from visual vernacular to fictional narratives. Students will analyze contents, themes and stylistic techniques of works done by various ASL literary artists. This course emphasizes practices in planning, developing, performing and critiquing various narrative genres.

This course provides an overview of various genres in American Sign Language Poetics ranging from ABC Stories to Poetry. Students will analyze contents, themes and stylistic techniques of works done by various ASL literary artists. This course emphasizes practices in planning, developing, performing and critiquing various works in the poetics genres.

This course introduces the concept of analysis and criticism of ASL texts. Students will learn how to provide feedback to other students who are doing ASL assignments in various disciplines. Students analyze the components of a variety of ASL rubrics and will prepare for the role of serving as an ASL tutor.

This course covers elocution, in other words, registers of ASL discourse -- frozen, formal, consultative, casual and intimate. Students will be able to discuss using ASL in the most common registers (formals, consultative and casual) in classrooms or at social events. They will also learn how to refine their skills in giving presentations using formal ASL.

This course demonstrates the use of space and eye gaze. It also demonstrates the use of role shifting to indicate speaker or locus of the subject/object in the ASL text. Organization of an ASL text and the function of these features will be covered. How they overlap with other features of the language will also be covered. Turn-taking regulators will be discussed within the conversation style of a discourse text.

This course will provide an overview of the role of attitudes and ethics in language, including an overview of differing ideologies' impact on the use and acceptance of sign language in our society, ranging from early intervention to the education system including neuroethics. International applications will be provided, including ethics of teaching American Sign Language in other countries. A framework of current challenges along with potential solutions will be discussed with applications to students' lives and experiences.

(Video) 25 ASL Signs You Need to Know | ASL Basics | American Sign Language for Beginners

This course focuses on understanding the deaf community's longstanding campaigns for sign language rights from an advocacy perspective. Topics covered include the history and status of sign language in education, language planning, policies and legislation on the state, national and international levels, as well as advocacy campaigns and organizations related to sign language rights.

This course introduces ASL majors to the field of ASL instruction. Areas covered will be methods, curriculum and training in the field. Discussion of ASLTA certification will be covered as well. Students will be able to observe ASL classes to assist them in understanding the pedagogy of ASL teaching.

This course introduces ASL majors to the application of ASL instruction. Areas covered will be applied to ASL teaching methods, ASL curriculum and ASL training in the field. Discussion of ASLTA certification will be covered as well. Students will be able to apply ASL resource development to assist them in understanding the pedagogy of ASL instruction.

The course is designed to give students the opportunity to develop an integrated research approach to the study of ASL in preparation for ASL senior seminar. This course will guide students in developing research questions, methodologies, data analysis and interpretation. Students will be encouraged to share their findings to public audiences.

This capstone course is required for those students who complete the prerequisite courses, and it is to enable them to review their prior learning in the program. The course is also designed to give students the opportunity to develop an integrated approach to the study of ASL. Students will be expected to do at least one research paper on a selected topic to be approved by the faculty member.

This course will begin with developing an understanding of the concept of ¿culture¿ and then will focus on the complexities and varieties of Deaf cultural experiences. Students will be asked to engage course materials through multi-disciplinary approaches in order to gain a critical appreciation of Deaf lives within historical, political and global contexts.

This course examines various forms of oppression by looking across different cultures and communities, then examines possible parallels occurring within the deaf community.

This course provides an introductory overview of the major linguistic structures of American Sign Language. Major topics are: phonology, morphology, syntax, language use, and linguistic applications. Some comparisons with English and other spoken and signed languages will be examined.

One elective ASL course from the following: 3 hours

This course is intended as a cumulative application of theories and methods learned in previous courses. Students will, with approval from internship supervisor and cooperating supervisor, select an internship site and responsibilities equivalent to number of credit hours earned. The responsibilities may include ASL tutoring, teaching, consulting, modeling, diagnosis, research and/or resource development. Students are responsible for reporting and reflecting on weekly responsibilities and attending weekly seminars with other interns. The reports and reflections will be integrated in an internship portfolio checked periodically throughout the semester by both the cooperating supervisor and the internship supervisor.

Special topics in the discipline, designed primarily for seniors who are majors or minors. Students may enroll in 495 Special Topics multiple times, as long as the topics differ.

(Video) Learn ASL: How to Sign about Graduation in American Sign Language

A project in the area of the student's special interest as it relates to sign communication. Title indicating the content must be available at time of registration.

Program Outcomes

1. Demonstrate theoretical and analytical knowledge of ASL linguistics and Literature.

2. Theoretical and analytical knowledge of the role of ASL in education, politics, and media.

3. Students in the program will produce college-level ASL and English texts that demonstrate knowledge of, and critical inquiry into, key concepts in the ASL discipline.

4. Students of the program will recognize the importance of the ASL expert as a system change agent and apply this in practice inside and outside the classroom utilizing effective leadership, advocacy, consultation, and collaboration to influence change on the individual, group, and organizational and systemic levels.

5. Demonstrate preparation for future career employment in the field of ASL

Job Outlook

Social Worker

The employment for Social Workers is expected to grow 13% from 2019 to 2029, with an average annual salary of $50,470. Learn more here.

Curation and Archiving

The employment for Museum work such as Curation, and Archiving is expected to grow at a 11% rate from 2019 to 2029, with an average annual salary of $49,850. Learn more here.

Interpreter

The employment for Interpreters is set to grow at a 20% rate between 2019 to 2029, with a median annual salary of $51,830. Learn more here.

Education, Training, and Library Occupations

The employment of Education, Training, and Library Occupations are expected to grow by a 5% rate from 2019-2029, with an average annual salary of $52,380. Learn more about career opportunities in education, training, and library occupations.

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Felicia Williams

Lecturer II/UG ASL Program Coordinator

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Back to American Sign Language

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FAQs

Can you major in American Sign Language? ›

Learners can pursue a degree in American Sign Language at the associate, bachelor's, and master's levels. Some programs offer concentrations. Common options include interpretation and deaf culture. Interpretation concentrations focus on translating and interpreting ASL.

How do I become a ASL interpreter in Kansas? ›

The Undergraduate and Graduate Certificates in ASL/English Interpreting aim to prepare students to sit for the NIC and BEI national certification exams so they are eligible for state credentialing in KS and MO. Students in KS who pass the performance certification exam are eligible to register in KS as an interpreter.

How do I become an ASL interpreter in Colorado? ›

Qualifications and Authorization:
  1. An associate's or higher degree from a regionally accredited college/university in educational interpreting or related field (such as American Sign Language)
  2. Certificate of completion of the EIPA written exam.

Does Kent State offer ASL? ›

The Kent State ASL/English Interpreting Program is an intensive major, challenging and preparing students for this dynamic field of sign language interpreting. All of our instructors are nationally certified with extensive and diverse careers as interpreters.

What is a degree in ASL called? ›

The American Sign Language English Interpretation (ASLEI) program is an accredited bachelor's degree that prepares you to provide competent interpreting services between individuals who are deaf and use ASL as their primary means of communication and individuals who are not deaf and do not know sign language.

What degree do I need to be an ASL interpreter? ›

The minimum requirement to be an ASL interpreter is a high school diploma or equivalent. However, many employers prefer a college degree in ASL, English, communication or interpretation, with additional coursework in ASL or deaf culture.

What are three 3 of the certification agencies available for interpreters in Kansas? ›

Contact Information
  • Kansas RID (KAI-RID)
  • Kansas Association of the Deaf (KAD)
  • Kansas Commission for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing (KCDHH)
14 Jun 2018

Does KU have ASL classes? ›

We are also excited to offer Deaf students advanced academic training in their heritage language. KU's undergraduate and graduate American Sign Language and Deaf studies certificates each address different levels of proficiency in ASL and understanding of Deaf culture.

How do I get involved in the deaf community? ›

Make yourself available through informal networking.

Let others know that you are available to serve as a resource in your community to parents trying to learn more about raising a deaf or hard of hearing child. Volunteer at schools with deaf and hard of hearing programs and related community events.

What college has the best ASL program? ›

Here are the best colleges with a Asl Major
  • Princeton University.
  • Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
  • Harvard University.
  • Stanford University.
  • Yale University.
  • University of Chicago.
  • Johns Hopkins University.
  • University of Pennsylvania.

How do I become a translator? ›

Here are several steps you should take to become a professional translator: Become fluent in another language. Get specialized training.
...
  1. Become fluent in another language. ...
  2. Get specialized training. ...
  3. Become certified. ...
  4. Target a specific industry and learn the terminology. ...
  5. Gain work experience.

What is a translation major? ›

Description: A program that prepares individuals to be professional interpreters and/or translators of documents and data files, either from English or (Canadian) French into another language or languages or vice versa.

What can you do with an associates degree in ASL? ›

Career Paths & Job Market
  • Full-time or part-time Interpreting in a variety of settings. Colleges and Universities. Public Schools. State Agencies. Hospitals and other medical/mental health institutions.
  • Freelance Interpreting.

What can I do with an AA in ASL? ›

Upon successful completion of this degree, students will be prepared for careers or employment in the following fields: entry-level interpreting, classroom aid, Deaf student aid, advocacy for Deaf culture.

How long does it take to learn ASL? ›

Overall, it can take several years of regular study and practice to become fluent in sign language. It may take from three months to three years to learn sign language. Moreover, it's all about your learning goal setting, and it all depends on your end goal.

Is ASL a good career? ›

As more hearing and deaf people learn sign language, the range of careers open to that skill has broadened. In fact, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics says a career as an interpreter is growing much faster than average, with 19% growth predicted through 2028.

What jobs can you get if you know ASL? ›

Sign language teachers work in areas that range from infant ASL programs to graduate level ASL instruction.
...
Other occupations include:
  • Sign Language Interpreter.
  • Speech Language Pathologist.
  • Psychologist.
  • Employment Counselor.
  • Social Worker.
  • Child Care Worker.
  • Audiologist.
8 Sept 2022

How do I get NIC certified? ›

NIC Certification Process
  1. Review all pertinent NIC webpages on the CASLI website.
  2. Apply for the NIC Knowledge Exam.
  3. Pass the NIC Knowledge Exam.
  4. Submit proof of meeting the educational requirement to RID.
  5. Apply for the NIC Interview and Performance Exam.
  6. Pass the NIC Interview and Performance Exam.
9 Jun 2021

What is Eipa certification? ›

Educational Interpreter Performance Test ®

The Educational Interpreter Performance Assessment (EIPA) is a tool designed to evaluate the voice-to-sign and sign-to-voice interpreting skills of interpreters who work in the elementary and secondary school classroom setting.

What is the Esse test? ›

The Educational Sign Skills Evaluation (ESSE) is a State approved test for K-12 Educational interpreters. It is designed to provide a means of identifying the dominant signing style of an individual and to provide meaningful, personalized feedback on areas of strength and those in need of improvement.

Is Eipa a national certification? ›

EDUCATIONAL INTERPRETER PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT (EIPA)

The EIPA is the most widely used assessment for educational interpreting skills and is specifically designed for K-12 school interpreters. The EIPA is a national certification managed through Boys Town National Research Hospital in Omaha, NE.

What is considered rude to a deaf person? ›

Body Language: Body language is crucially important in deaf culture. Much like how it would be rude to walk out of the room when someone is talking to you, in deaf culture, it is considered rude to look away when someone is signing to you.

How do you greet a deaf person? ›

Greetings, Farewells and Introductions in ASL - YouTube

What are the 4 components of Deaf culture? ›

All cultures, including Deaf culture have four components: language, behavioral norms, values and traditions. For Deaf culture, vision plays a significant role in each of the four components. People who are Deaf rely strongly on their vision to communicate and gather information.

How many US colleges offer ASL? ›

38 Universities in the USA offering Sign Language degrees and courses.

What is college ASL? ›

COLLEGE: The American Sign Language (ASL) sign for "college"

The dominant hand starts from a couple inches above the base hand and does a circling movement as it slaps downward and comes back up a few inches.

Does Yale have ASL? ›

The Department of Linguistics is pleased to host the very first language courses in American Sign Language (ASL) ever taught in Yale College, starting in the upcoming Spring 2018 semester.

What translators are in demand? ›

Here are the languages in the highest demand for translators.
  • Spanish. Most people will be able to guess correctly that Spanish is the language in the highest demand for translators. ...
  • Mandarin. Mandarin is another language in very high demand, especially in the international business sector. ...
  • German. ...
  • Any Language.
29 Nov 2018

Do translators make good money? ›

Interpreters and Translators made a median salary of $52,330 in 2020. The best-paid 25 percent made $72,630 that year, while the lowest-paid 25 percent made $38,410.

How much does a Netflix translator make? ›

Subtitle Translator Salaries
Job TitleSalary
Netflix Subtitle Translator salaries - 1 salaries reported$5,577/mo
ZOO Digital Group Subtitle Translator salaries - 1 salaries reported$4,937/mo
Pixelogic Media Subtitler/Translator salaries - 1 salaries reported$4,424/mo
14 more rows
13 Dec 2021

Which Bachelor degree is best for translator? ›

  • Specialized Bachelor in Translation. ...
  • Bachelor in Translation. ...
  • Bachelor of Arts in Translation. ...
  • Bachelor of Science in Spanish Translation and Interpretation Comprehensive. ...
  • Bachelor of Arts in Translation Studies. ...
  • Bachelors of Science in Translation and Interpretation.

Is translation a Bachelor of Arts? ›

This program is designed to provide the training and theoretical background to equip you to work as a professional interpreter and translator.

Are interpreter and translator same? ›

An interpreter works with spoken language, whereas a translator works with written materials. In order to do their jobs effectively, interpreters and translators must have not only a solid grasp of at least two languages but also an in-depth understanding of foreign cultures.

What's your major in ASL? ›

The sign for MAJOR is produced with "B" hands. Your non-dominant hand's palm faces to the right and your dominant hand's palm faces to the left. Only the dominant hand moves forward off the non-dominant hand.

How long does it take to get a degree in ASL? ›

The degree or certificate takes a minimum of three years starting with ASL III. If starting with ASL I, it takes a minimum of four years to complete all ITP coursework. For those taking general education courses, duration will vary depending on how many units are required and how many days per week students attend.

Is American Sign Language a good career? ›

As more hearing and deaf people learn sign language, the range of careers open to that skill has broadened. In fact, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics says a career as an interpreter is growing much faster than average, with 19% growth predicted through 2028.

What can I do with a degree in ASL? ›

Many colleges and universities offer American Sign Language (ASL) and/or Deaf Studies programs.
...
Jobs Working with Deaf and Hard of Hearing
  • Sign Language Interpreter.
  • Speech Language Pathologist.
  • Psychologist.
  • Employment Counselor.
  • Social Worker.
  • Child Care Worker.
  • Audiologist.
8 Sept 2022

What is job in ASL? ›

Job has two sign options: either finger-spell the ASL letters J and B (but making sure that the 'B' has your palm facing in this time), or simply make the sign for work.

How do you say psychology in ASL? ›

American Sign Language: "psychology"

Memory aid: Imagine you are holding someone's brain in your non-dominant hand. Make sure your palm is facing outward. Then take your rather large, imposing knife and "hack into" that persons brain.

What is college ASL? ›

COLLEGE: The American Sign Language (ASL) sign for "college"

The dominant hand starts from a couple inches above the base hand and does a circling movement as it slaps downward and comes back up a few inches.

What college has the best ASL program? ›

Here are the best colleges with a Asl Major
  • Princeton University.
  • Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
  • Harvard University.
  • Stanford University.
  • Yale University.
  • University of Chicago.
  • Johns Hopkins University.
  • University of Pennsylvania.

What can you do with an associate's degree in ASL? ›

Career Paths & Job Market
  • Full-time or part-time Interpreting in a variety of settings. Colleges and Universities. Public Schools. State Agencies. Hospitals and other medical/mental health institutions.
  • Freelance Interpreting.

How difficult is it to learn ASL? ›

Individual signs are relatively easy to learn. Like any spoken language, ASL is a language with its own unique rules of grammar and syntax. To learn enough signs for basic communication and to sign them comfortably, can take a year or more.

Do ASL translators make good money? ›

The salaries of American Sign Language Interpreters in the US range from $16,217 to $430,462 , with a median salary of $78,441 . The middle 57% of American Sign Language Interpreters makes between $78,447 and $195,778, with the top 86% making $430,462.

Is sign language in demand? ›

There is a high demand for American Sign Language interpreters, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, and demand will continue to grow by 19 percent from 2018 to 2028.

Is being an ASL interpreter stressful? ›

Working as an ASL interpreter may be stressful. For example, you may receive little to no notice about a job, or you may feel frustrated trying to interpret phrases at a new type of event. However, maintaining professionalism may help you succeed during stressful situations.

What job can a deaf person do? ›

According to a report from the National Deaf Center on Postsecondary Outcomes, the top sectors in which deaf people are employed include manufacturing, healthcare, retail, professional services, and construction.

What is teacher in ASL? ›

Make the teacher sign by signing teach and then person. First, sign by placing both hands on the sides of your head and closing your fingers and your thumbs a short distance away from your forehead, in close proximity to your ears.

What can you do with a minor in ASL? ›

The ASL minor program will prepare students for careers in a variety of fields, including medicine, business, interpreting, counseling, and teaching.

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4. ME vs. MY in American Sign Language
(Sign With Courtney)
5. Careers Using Sign Language ┃ ASL Stew
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6. Announcing the new American Sign Language (ASL)and Deaf Studies Bachelor's Degree Program
(KU Edwards Campus)

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