Best performing super funds in Australia (2022)

2021 is the ninth year Stockspot has researched Australia’s largest super funds for our annual Fat Cat Funds Report.

We report on the top performing super funds by comparing ~600 multi-asset investment options offered by Australia’s largest 100 super funds to find the best super funds – and the worst. The funds were assessed on how they performed, after fees, compared to other super options of similar risk over five years.

Download the report now to see how your fund compares, or keep reading a summary of our research.

  • Top performing super funds – Fit Cat Funds
  • Worst performing super funds – Fat Cat Funds
  • Best performing aggressive growth super funds
  • Best performing growth super funds
  • Best performing balanced super funds
  • Best performing moderate super funds
  • Industry vs retail super fund performance
  • How does Stockspot compare?
  • Best super funds 2021

    Best performing super funds in Australia (1)

    2021 Gold Fit Cat Fund Awards – Unisuper and Qantas Super

    In 2021, Unisuper took out the Gold Fit Cat Fund award for a second consecutive year for the most top performing funds over five years. Unisuper is one of the largest super funds in Australia managing over $100b for its 450,000+ members. It shares the award this year with Qantas Super, as their corporate superannuation plan for its staff had four Fit Cat Funds.

    UniSuper Fit Cat Fund Options
    UniSuper – High Growth
    UniSuper – Sustainable High Growth
    UniSuper – Sustainable Balanced
    UniSuper – Balanced
    QANTAS SUPER FIT CAT FUND OPTIONS
    Qantas Super – Growth
    Qantas Super – Balanced
    Qantas Super – Glidepath: Destination
    Qantas Super – Conservative

    2021 Silver Fit Cat Fund Award – AustralianSuper and Fiducian Super

    The Silver award goes to both AustralianSuper and Fiducian Super with four Fit Cat Funds each. AustralianSuper is no stranger to the Stockspot Fit Cat Fund Awards having taken out the Bronze award in 2020, while Fiducian (a retail super fund with over $2b in assets) makes its first appearance in our list.

    AUSTRALIANSUPER FIT CAT FUND OPTIONS
    AustralianSuper – Balanced
    AustralianSuper – Conservative Balanced
    AustralianSuper – Stable
    FIDUCIAN SUPER FIT CAT FUND OPTIONS
    Fiducian Super – Ultra Growth Fund
    Fiducian Super – Balanced Fund
    Fiducian Super – Capital Stable Fund

    2021 Bronze Fit Cat Fund Awards – Aware Super, IOOF, Holden and AMG

    The Bronze award gets shared between multiple superannuation providers this year. After taking out the Silver award last year, IOOF shares the Bronze award with Aware Super, Holden Corporate Super plan and AMG Super.

    AWARE SUPER FIT CAT FUND OPTIONS
    Aware Super – High Growth
    Aware Super – Growth
    IOOF SUPER FIT CAT FUND OPTIONS
    IOOF – MultiMix Balanced Growth
    IOOF – MultiMix Capital Stable
    HOLDEN SUPER FIT CAT FUND OPTIONS
    Holden Employees Superannuation Fund – Cautious
    Holden Employees Superannuation Fund – Conservative
    AMG SUPER FIT CAT FUND OPTIONS
    AMG Super – AMG Balanced
    AMG Super – AMG Capital Stable

    What did the top three super funds have in common? Low fees!

    Despite having different investment strategies, the one factor these funds all had in common was investment fees of around 1% or under.

    Congratulations to our Fit Cat Fund winners for 2021. Don’t forget to check on their performance in our Fat Cat Funds Report next year.

    Worst super funds 2021

    Best performing super funds in Australia (2)

    Last place: OnePath

    Onepath has topped our list for the most Fat Cat Funds with a grand total of 10 underperforming options, and has been in the Fat Cat Fund category for nine years in a row. Last year, we called upon IOOF (OnePath’s parent owner and 2021 Fit Cat Bronze Award) to look to lower its fees and improve their performance, but it looks like they prefer to keep expensive fund options and members locked into underperforming funds for their own benefit.

    ONEPATH FAT CAT FUND OPTIONS
    OnePath – OptiMix Balanced
    OnePath – Managed Growth
    OnePath – Active Growth
    OnePath – OptiMix Growth Trust
    OnePath – OptiMix High Growth
    OnePath – OptiMix Moderate
    OnePath – Tax Effective Income
    OnePath – OptiMix Conservative
    OnePath – Conservative
    OnePath – Balanced

    Second last place: AMP

    AMP came in 2nd place, with 6 Fat Cat Funds. AMP’s share price has fallen by almost 80% since we published the first Fat Cat Funds Report in 2013, having been through five different CEOs, and billions have been withdrawn from underperforming AMP products. While they have improved from last year’s Gold Winner, their complex and legacy suite of products (which they are looking to rationalise) has led to their demise of yet another year in the Fat Cat list.

    Watch our AMP Fat Cat Fund video produced in partnership with The Chaser back in 2016

    (Video) The best performing super funds | Nine News Australia

    AMP FAT CAT FUND OPTIONS
    AMP – FS – AMP Capital Multi-Asset
    AMP – FLS – Future Directions Conservative
    AMP – FLS – Professional Conservative
    AMP – FS – Schroder Real Return
    AMP – FLS – AMP Conservative
    AMP – FS – Super Easy Conservative
    AMP – FS – AMP Capital Multi-Asset

    Third last place: MLC, Zurich and Energy Industries Superannuation Scheme (EISS)

    The Bronze award for third last-place is shared amongst the larger wealth managers in MLC and Zurich due their complex product suite, high fees and poor performing investment options. MLC is in a similar position to OnePath, being acquired by a Fit Cat in IOOF. Interestingly, EISS also received the Bronze Fat Cat award as the public superannuation fund for three investment options that underperformed.

    MLC FAT CAT FUND OPTIONS
    MLC – Inflation Plus – Assertive Portfolio
    MLC – Inflation Plus – Conservative Portfolio
    MLC – Inflation Plus – Moderate Portfolio
    ZURICH FAT CAT FUND OPTIONS
    Zurich – Managed Growth
    Zurich – Balanced
    Zurich – Capital Stable
    Energy Industries Superannuation Scheme (EISS) FAT CAT FUND OPTIONS
    Energy Industries Superannuation Scheme (EISS) – Balanced (MySuper)
    Energy Industries Superannuation Scheme (EISS) – Conservative
    Energy Industries Superannuation Scheme (EISS) – Conservative Balanced

    Want to compare your super even further? Read the full 2021 Fat Cats Fund Report here.

    Comparison of different super fund categories

    Super funds that were analysed by Stockspot go by many names: balanced, diversified, moderately conservative, moderate and capital stable.

    Investors need to be careful to understand the asset mix of their fund, not rely on how it has been named.

    Find out more about how to choose the right super fund.

    Best and worst performing aggressive growth super funds

    Aggressive growth super funds are funds with at least 80% in growth assets like shares and property and generally targeted at investors with a very long investment horizon given that they can be very volatile over the short term.

    The top performing aggressive growth super funds had very little in defensive assets such as bonds and cash. This helped them achieve returns of 12-15% p.a. over five years, as growth assets have enjoyed strong returns in recent years despite the COVID-19 fall.

    It should be noted that the equivalent Vanguard index fund still beat 86% of high growth funds over the past five years.

    OnePath featured heavily in the Fat Cat Fund list with five of the worst 10 performing funds. Meanwhile industry funds (e.g. UniSuper) took out most of the top 10 performing aggressive super funds.

    TOP 10 AGGRESSIVE GROWTH FUNDS5 YEAR RETURN (P.A.)
    1.MLC – Horizon 7 Accelerated Growth Portfolio14.9%
    2.UniSuper – High Growth13.5%
    3.UniSuper – Sustainable High Growth13.2%
    4.Equipsuper – Growth Plus12.7%
    5.Fiducian Super – Ultra Growth Fund12.5%
    6.Hostplus – Shares Plus12.3%
    7.CBUS – High Growth12.1%
    8.NGS Super – Share Plus11.9%
    9.Aware Super – High Growth11.8%
    10.Plum Super – Pre-mixed Aggressive11.7%
    BOTTOM 10 AGGRESSIVE GROWTH FUNDS5 YEAR RETURN (P.A.)
    1.OnePath – OptiMix Balanced5.3%
    2.OnePath – Managed Growth5.6%
    3.OnePath – Active Growth5.7%
    4.MLC – Inflation Plus – Assertive Portfolio6.3%
    5.Colonial First State (CFS) Rollover & Superannuation – Future Leaders6.4%
    6.OnePath – OptiMix Growth6.5%
    7.Zurich – Managed Growth6.6%
    8.Commonwealth Bank Group Super – Balanced (MySuper)7.0%
    9.Energy Industries Superannuation Scheme (EISS) – Balanced (MySuper)7.4%
    10.OnePath – OptiMix High Growth7.6%

    Aggressive growth super funds: average fee & returns

    The bottom funds in this category typically had more cash and bonds, poor outperforming active managers, and higher fees. The average fee in this category was 2.3% which dragged performance down to 5.3-7.6% p.a.

    Here the correlation between fees and returns can be clearly seen.

    (Video) Top 5 Superannuation Funds in Australia

    AVERAGE FEE (P.A.)AVERAGE 5 YEAR RETURN (P.A.)
    Top 101.2%12.7%
    Bottom 102.3%6.5%

    Best and worst performing growth super funds

    Growth super funds have 60-80% in growth assets like shares and property and, like aggressive growth funds, are generally targeted at younger investors with a long investment horizon given that they can be quite volatile over the short term.

    Industry funds such as HESTA, UniSuper, Aware Super and Australian Super were in the top 10 growth super funds.

    The top performing funds in this group had a relatively small (23.5%) allocation to bonds and cash. This allowed them to return 9.4-11.8% p.a. over five years, with the higher allocation to growth investments helping them to enjoy a strong few years of returns.

    It should be noted that a simple index fund still beat 90% of all growth funds over the past five years.

    Top 10 Growth Super Funds5 YEAR RETURN (P.A.)
    1.HESTA – Sustainable Growth11.8%
    2.Australian Super – Balanced10.4%
    3.UniSuper – Sustainable Balanced10.2%
    4.Fiducian – Balanced9.9%
    5.Aware Super – Growth9.8%
    6.IOOF – MultiMix Balanced Growth9.7%
    7.UniSuper – Balanced9.6%
    8.Lutheran Super – Balanced Growth (MySuper)9.5%
    9.Victorian Superannuation – Growth (MySuper)9.5%
    10.Qantas Super – Growth9.4%
    BOTTOM 10 GROWTH SUPER FUNDS5 YEAR RETURN (P.A.)
    1.AMP – FS – AMP Capital Multi-Asset3.6%
    2.OnePath – OptiMix Moderate3.9%
    3.OnePath – OnePath Tax Effective Income4.0%
    4.Energy Industries Superannuation Scheme (EISS) – Conservative4.2%
    5.Zurich – Balanced4.5%
    6.AON – smartMonday MySuper – Age 655.6%
    7.Perpetual WealthFocus – Perpetual Diversified Growth5.7%
    8.MyLifeMyMoney – RetirePlus5.8%
    9.Energy Industries Superannuation Scheme (EISS) – Conservative Balanced5.8%
    10.ARA Retirement Fund – Growth5.9%


    Growth super funds: average fee & returns

    Retail super funds such as AMP, OnePath and Zurich performed the worst out of growth super funds. The bottom funds in this group typically had a higher (33%) allocation to cash and bonds and high fees of 1.8% on average. This pulled down their performance to 3.6-5.9% p.a.

    AVERAGE FEE (P.A.)AVERAGE 5 YEAR RETURN (P.A.)
    Top 10 growth super funds1.1%10.0%
    Bottom 10 growth super funds1.8%4.9%

    Download the Fat Cat Funds Report to dive deeper into the best and worst performing super funds in Australia

    Best and worst performing balanced super funds

    Balanced super funds are funds with 40-60% in growth assets like shares and property and generally targeted at investors in their forties and fifties with a medium to long investment horizon.

    The top performers in this group had a 43% allocation to fixed income and cash. This helped them achieve returns of 6.4-8% p.a. over five years.

    However, a simple Vanguard index fund beat an extraordinary 95% of balanced funds over the past five years.

    TOP 10 BALANCED SUPER FUNDS5 YEAR RETURN (P.A.)
    1.Australian Super – Conservative Balanced8.0%
    2.AMG Super – Balanced7.6%
    3.Colonial First State – FirstChoice Multi-Index Moderate7.3%
    4.Qantas Super – Balanced7.2%
    5.Qantas Super – Glidepath: Destination7.2%
    6.QSuper – Lifetime Focus 26.8%
    7.Local Government Super – Balanced6.7%
    8.LGIAsuper – Balanced6.5%
    9.Holden Employees Super – Cautious6.5%
    10.legalsuper – Conservative balanced6.4%
    BOTTOM 10 BALANCED SUPER FUNDS5 YEAR RETURN (P.A.)
    1.Zurich – Capital Stable2.5%
    2.OnePath – OptiMix Conservative2.6%
    3.OnePath – Conservative2.7%
    4.MLC – Inflation Plus – Conservative Portfolio2.9%
    5.Plum Super – Pre-mixed Conservative3.9%
    6.AON – smartMonday MySuper – Age 75 and above3.9%
    7.MLC – MLC Inflation Plus – Moderate Portfolio4.0%
    8.OnePath – Balanced4.1%
    9.Club Plus – Conservative Balanced4.1%
    10.Perpetual WealthFocus – Perpetual Conservative Growth4.2%

    Balanced super funds: average fee & returns

    Funds like Onepath and MLC performed the worst out of balanced super funds. The bottom funds in this group typically had a 41% allocation to defensive assets like bonds and cash. This combined with their high fees pulled down their performance to 2.5-4.2% p.a.

    (Video) The Best Australian Superannuation Funds - Top 10 Ranked

    AVERAGE FEE (P.A.)AVERAGE 5 YEAR RETURN (P.A.)
    Top 10 balanced super funds0.9%7.0%
    Bottom 10 balanced super funds1.8%3.5%

    Best and worst performing moderate super funds

    Moderate super funds are funds with 20-40% in growth assets like shares and property and generally targeted at older investors with a short to medium investment horizon given that they are relatively stable over the short term.

    Industry and public sector funds made up nearly half of the Top 10 Fit Cat Funds.

    The top performing funds in this group had a 64% allocation to bonds and cash. This helped them achieve returns of 4.8-6% p.a. over five years.

    The bottom performing funds in this group typically had a slightly higher allocation to cash and bonds as well as higher fees. This reduced their performance to 3-4% p.a, mainly for the retail funds such as AMP, and corporate plans for the major big banks like ANZ and Commonwealth Bank. Surprisingly one of our 2020 Fit Cats, QSuper had a fund in the Fat Cat list for the moderate category.

    TOP 10 MODERATE SUPER FUNDS (FAT CAT FUNDS)5 YEAR RETURN (P.A.)
    1.AustralianSuper – Stable6.0%
    2.Fiducian Super – Capital Stable Fund5.5%
    3.NESS Super – Stable5.5%
    4.Qantas Super – Conservative5.4%
    5.AMG Super – Capital Stable5.4%
    6.ANZ Staff Super – Cautious5.3%
    7.Media Super – Stable5.2%
    8.Holden Employees Super – Conservative4.9%
    9.Guild Retirement Fund – Conservative4.8%
    10.IOOF – MultiMix Capital Stable4.8%
    BOTTOM 10 BALANCED SUPER FUNDS(FAT CAT FUNDS)5 YEAR RETURN (P.A.)
    1.The ARA Retirement Fund – Defensive3.2%
    2.AMP – FLS – Future Directions Conservative3.2%
    3.AMP – FLS – Professional Conservative3.3%
    4.AMP – FS- Schroder Real Return3.3%
    5.QSuper – Lifetime Sustain 23.4%
    6.AMP – FLS – AMP Conservative3.5%
    7.Commonwealth Bank Group Super – Conservative3.9%
    8.AMP – FS – Super Easy Conservative3.9%
    9.Asgard – MySuper – life stage 1940’s3.9%
    10.ANZ Australian Staff Super – Smart Choice Conservative4.0%

    Moderate super funds: fees and performance

    Due to the lower returns from moderate super funds, older Australians and pensioners in lower risk super strategies need to be even more sensitive to fees.

    Compare the fees of the best performing moderate super funds with the worst performing:

    AVERAGE FEE (P.A.)AVERAGE 5 YEAR RETURN (P.A.)
    Top 100.9%5.3%
    Bottom 101.2%3.5%

    Industry vs retail super fund performance

    Industry funds (and public sector funds) continue to do better than retail funds. The reason for this is due to:

    • Lower fees – industry funds have almost 40% lower fees than the average retail fund. Not having a profit motive means they are not profit driven, but that doesn’t mean that they are all “low cost”.
    • Asset allocation – industry funds tend to have a higher allocation to unlisted assets such as property, infrastructure and private equity which have enjoyed strong recent returns.

    Large retail funds from AMP and OnePath dominated the Fat Cat Funds with the majority of bottom 10 funds being a retail fund. The common theme is these funds charge higher than average fees.

    The bottom performing funds in this group typically also had a larger allocation to cash and bonds and higher fees.

    Read more about comparing industry super funds

    Superannuation Comparison: Our Analysis

    (Video) I Found THE Best Super FundS (2022) ?!

    Many superannuation funds don’t index

    Both Stockspot and the Vanguard Index Fund options have beaten the average Industry fund and approximately 90% of funds in total after fees and taxes.This is largely due to the compounding effect of lower fees.

    Additionally, superannuation managers can easily access low cost index funds, yet many choose not to. We believe this is because there are still huge conflicts of interest in the industry.


    Source: Stockspot, Vanguard diversified index fund performance after all fees and taxes based on an accumulation super account

    Super funds would rather pay themselves – their big teams of fund managers, analysts and asset consultants – despite the evidence that they do not add any value to super fund investment returns.

    Bigger super funds don’t perform better

    Super funds members don’t always enjoy benefits by joining larger funds. In many cases there are added costs as funds grow which lead to higher per-member fees. This is because of the cost of legacy administration systems and active investing.

    There are more large funds who are Fat Cat Funds and they are usually between $20 billion and $50 billion in size. The best performing funds tend to either be between $5 and $20 billion or over $50 billion in size.

    We expect more consolidation and merging in the industry, having already seen the likes of Qsuper and Sunsuper, Hostplus and Statewide, in addition to Aware Super’s recent acquisition of First State Super, VicSuper and WA Super, to become one of the biggest superannuation funds in Australia.Find out how to choose the right super fund here.

    Compare your superannuation fund to investing with Stockspot

    The table below compares average super fund performance across growth, balanced and moderate strategies.

    The more conservative the portfolio, the harder it is to beat an index fund portfolio.

    AVERAGE SUPER FUND 5 YEAR RETURN (P.A.)STOCKSPOT 5 YEAR RETURN AFTER FEES AND TAXES (P.A)STOCKSPOT OVERALL PERFORMANCE
    Growth7.7%11.5% (Topaz)
    10.1% (Emerald)
    Top 1%
    Balanced5.4%8.9% (Turquoise)
    8.2% (Sapphire)
    Stockspot’s portfolios beat all balanced superannuation funds
    Moderate4.4%7.2% (Amethyst)Stockspot’s portfolios beat all moderate superannuation funds

    If you’re not happy with your superannuation, you have a few options:

    • You can switch your super fund because there are some super funds who offer indexed super options with low fees and consistent performance.
    • If you’re ready to invest outside of your superannuation, low cost indexing is another way for Australians to get consistent returns.

    If you want to compare your super, see our annual superannuation comparison, the Fat Cat Funds Report.

    (Video) How to Compare Super Funds | Top 5 Australian Super Funds review

    Compare your super now

    FAQs

    What is the best performing super fund in Australia 2022? ›

    SuperRatings. SuperRatings was the first cab off the rank to announce its 2022 Fund of the Year award winners on 29 October 2021. UniSuper took out the top gong for Super Fund of the Year in recognition of its strong investment performance, competitive fees and ongoing focus on members.

    What is the best super fund in Australia 2021? ›

    Aware Super has been named Best Super Fund in Money magazine's 2021 Best of the Best Awards. The awards for Best Pension Fund and Best MySuper Product were taken out by Cbus and AustralianSuper respectively.

    What is the average return on superannuation 2022? ›

    The average return over 10 years for AustralianSuper's Balanced option is 9.32% per annum to 30 June 20221. For the Balanced option for Choice Income accounts, the 10 year average return is 10.27% per annum.

    What is the best performing pension fund in Australia? ›

    Top 10 performing pension funds (Growth)
    Pension fundInvestment optionReturn
    AustralianSuperBalanced10.3%
    Cbus SuperGrowth10.0%
    UniSuperBalanced9.9%
    Australian Retirement TrustBalanced9.8%
    6 more rows

    Which super fund has the highest returns? ›

    Top 10 performing super funds (Balanced)
    Super fundInvestment option10 yr return (% per yr)
    AustralianSuperConservative Balanced7.5%
    VicSuperBalanced7.4%
    Telstra SuperDefensive Growth7.3%
    Vision SuperBalanced7.3%
    6 more rows

    What is the best super company in Australia? ›

    The Best Overall – AustralianSuper

    It's Balanced Fund received the Finder award for the best Australian super fund in 2021 and has been one of the strongest performing super funds of all time.

    What is a good return on super? ›

    All risk categories have also met their long-term return objectives, which typically range from CPI (a measure of inflation) +2% for Conservative funds to CPI +4.25% for All Growth.
    ...
    Super fund performance: Calendar years (1993 to 2021)
    Calendar yearReturn (%)
    202113.4%
    20203.7%
    201914.7%
    20180.8%
    25 more rows
    19 Jul 2022

    Is AustralianSuper a good super fund? ›

    AustralianSuper has a total of 2.88 Million members and $258 billion in member assets as at 30 June 2022. Awards and ratings are only one factor to be taken into account when choosing a super fund. a) Finder Awards Best Rated Brand – Super Fund (Industry) winner 2020/2021 according to research conducted by Kantar.

    What is the biggest super fund in Australia? ›

    AustralianSuper remains the biggest fund on both counts, with assets worth $244.9 billion (up 29% in a year, and 2,468,216 members (up 4% in a year).

    Will Super go up in 2022? ›

    Superannuation guarantee (SG) rising to 10.5%

    From 1 July 2022, the super guarantee rise from 10% to 10.5%. Further increases of 0.5% are scheduled each year, until it reaches 12% in 2025.

    Why is AustralianSuper dropping? ›

    The negative superannuation returns most funds experienced in FY 2021/22 were largely caused by drops in the values of Australian and international shares. These sharemarket falls in turn were caused by factors including rising inflation, interest rate hikes and international events like the war in Ukraine.

    Can I lose my superannuation? ›

    Lost super is super money held by superannuation funds. You become a ' lost member' and your super becomes 'lost' if you are: uncontactable – the fund has lost contact with you and your account hasn't received a contribution or rollover for 12 months.

    What is a good return on pension investment? ›

    So 7% (4% real return + 3% inflation) is a reasonable average pension growth rate based on historical returns.

    What are the best performing pension funds? ›

    Top five personal pensions in 2022
    • Halifax portfolio. Best for: Customer experience. ...
    • Fidelity Personal Investing Cost Focus portfolio* Best for: Large range of ready made portfolios. ...
    • Evestor portfolio. Best for: Investors looking to invest small sums. ...
    • Nutmeg Fixed Allocation portfolio* ...
    • Vanguard Target Retirement portfolio.
    31 Aug 2022

    What is the difference between a super fund and a pension fund? ›

    In simple terms, a super fund is what you make contributions to while you are saving for retirement, while a pension fund is a fund that pays you an income when you are retired. You are only allowed to make contributions to a super fund. Pension funds cannot receive additional funds once they are set up.

    How much super do I need to retire at 60? ›

    ASFA estimates people who want a comfortable retirement need $640,000 for a couple, and $545,000 for a single person when they leave work, assuming they also receive a partial age pension from the federal government.

    Can you have more than one super fund? ›

    Under super legislation it's perfectly legal to establish and run more than one SMSF, just as it's fine to have a super account in more than one super fund.

    How much super Should I have at 40? ›

    So, what are the current average balances for different age groups?
    Average super balance by age2
    25 – 29$25,173$21,774
    30 – 34$51,175$42,240
    35 – 39$83,723$66,611
    40 – 44$121,119$92,680
    5 more rows
    1 Jul 2022

    Can you change super funds after retirement? ›

    Yes, you can. If you've got more than one super fund and you want to roll them all over into your new fund, you need to complete separate forms for each one (this is the process we outlined in step 3). Your new super fund will contact each of your current super funds to arrange for the money to be transferred.

    Why are industry super funds better? ›

    Industry super funds have historically outperformed their retail counterparts in returns generated for their members* and are generally a reliable option for most people. When deciding between superannuation funds, consider the: long-term investment performance of the fund* investment options available.

    Should I change super funds? ›

    Look at the long-term performance and investment returns

    The performance of your super fund can make a big difference to your balance. Switching to a super fund that has a history of strong returns may mean you end up with more money in retirement.

    Where should I put my superannuation? ›

    The best super investment mix will usually have exposure to Australian shares, international shares, property, fixed interest, cash and possibly alternative assets such as infrastructure, commodities and private equity.

    Is it better to invest in super or property? ›

    Key points. Keeping money in a high-growth super fund would have offered a better return than investing in property over the past 10 years. Property returns were more likely to be competitive with super in expensive neighbourhoods. Choosing property has intangible benefits, too, such as the security of home ownership.

    Why is my super not growing? ›

    However, the value of your super will not increase 'in a straight line' like a bank account that is paid a constant interest rate. Instead, it changes in line with the value of the underlying assets of the investment options in which your super is invested.

    What is the return on AustralianSuper? ›

    Super and TTR Income investment option performance as at 31 March 2022
    Investment Option3 months10 years pa
    High Growth-2.65%10.93%
    Balanced-2.12%9.84%
    Socially Aware-3.17%9.18%
    Indexed Diversified-3.56%7.91%
    8 more rows

    How much super Should I be paid? ›

    In simple terms, the Superannuation Guarantee requires that the minimum super an employer needs to pay an employee is 10.5% of that employee's gross salary. This rate is gradually increasing to 12% by 1 July 2025.

    Can I choose my own super fund? ›

    Most people can choose which super fund they'd like their super contributions paid into. You can go with your existing fund, your employer's fund, or choose a different fund. Your employer will give you a 'standard choice form' when you start a new job.

    Which super funds failed the performance test? ›

    Which super funds failed the test a second consecutive time? Note: the Westpac Group Plan MySuper product, provided by BT Funds Management (Retirement Wrap), failed the annual performance test for the first time in 2022.

    Who is AustralianSuper owned by? ›

    AustralianSuper is owned by the Australian Council of Trade Unions (ACTU) and employer peak body the Australian Industry Group (Ai Group).

    What is the biggest pension fund in the world? ›

    Government Pension Investment

    How much super Should I have 2022? ›

    According to ASFA's March 2022 figures, individuals and couples around age 67, who own their own home and are looking to retire today would need an annual budget of around $46,494 or $65,445 respectively to fund a comfortable lifestyle2.

    What will Super do in 2022? ›

    From July 1st 2022, the Super Guarantee increases to 10.5%. It will increase by 0.5% on the 1st of July each year until it reaches 12% in 2025.

    Are Australian pensioners getting a pay rise in 2022? ›

    Latest Age Pension rates (from 20 September 2022)

    From 20 September 2022 the maximum full Age Pension increases $38.90 per fortnight for a single person, and $29.40 per person per fortnight for a couple.

    How do I protect my super from the market crash? ›

    But while it may seem tempting to shift some of your super into cash, financial planners say the best way to withstand a market crash is to stand your ground and stay invested. Trying to time the market by selling shares and then buying back in later is fraught with difficulty, they say.

    What percentage of super should be in cash? ›

    Balanced. Investment mix: around 70% in shares or property, and 30% in fixed interest and cash. Or 'moderate' option with 50% in shares and property. Returns: Aims for reasonable returns, but less than growth funds to reduce risk of losses in bad years.

    What happens if your super fund goes bust? ›

    The Bankruptcy Act states that, if a person becomes bankrupt, funds held in a person's regulated super fund are protected and unavailable to creditors. In addition, a bankrupt person can withdraw money from their super funds, subject to superannuation regulations, and spend these amounts as they wish.

    What age can I withdraw my superannuation? ›

    You can withdraw your super: when you turn 65 (even if you haven't retired) when you reach preservation age and retire, or. under the transition to retirement rules, while continuing to work.

    Can I contribute to my super if I'm not working? ›

    Anyone under 65 can contribute to super. It does not matter if you are employed, self-employed, not working or retired. Your spouse and/or employer can also make contributions on your behalf.

    What happens to my super when I leave my job? ›

    Unless you do something about it, your super will probably stay in its current account/s. You can choose to leave it where it is, but you might want to consider your other options also.

    Where is the safest place to put your retirement money? ›

    The safest place to put your retirement funds is in low-risk investments and savings options with guaranteed growth. Low-risk investments and savings options include fixed annuities, savings accounts, CDs, treasury securities, and money market accounts. Of these, fixed annuities usually provide the best interest rates.

    Is it better to take a higher lump sum or pension? ›

    Lump-sum payments give you more control over your money, allowing you the flexibility of spending it or investing it when and how you see fit. Studies show that retirees with monthly pension income are more likely to maintain their spending levels than those who take lump-sum distributions.

    What is the best way to invest pension lump sum? ›

    When you take a lump sum pension payout, one investment option is to roll the funds into an IRA. Once in the IRA, you can use some of the funds to purchase an immediate annuity, which is an investment vehicle that offers regular payments to investors for a specified period of time.

    How long will 300k last in retirement? ›

    How long will $300,000 last in retirement? If you have $300,000 and withdraw 4% per year, that number could last you roughly 25 years. That's $12,000, which is not enough to live on its own unless you have additional income like Social Security and own your own place. Luckily, that $300,000 can go up if you invest it.

    How can I get 50000 pension per month? ›

    Rs 50,000 monthly pension from NPS

    If you only use the mandatory 40% NPS corpus for purchasing annuity, then at annuity rate of 6%, you need a Rs 2.5 crore NPS corpus. Out of this, 40% or Rs 1 core will be used for purchasing annuity. This annuity (at 6%) will generate Rs 6 lakh yearly or Rs 50,000 monthly pension.

    Which mutual funds are best for next 5 years? ›

    Best SIP Plans for 5 And 3 Years in Equity Funds and Debt Funds
    Fund Name5 years Return3 years Return
    DSP Equity Fund14.36%14.69%
    ICICI Prudential Technology Fund33.91%41.39%
    HDFC Balance Advantage Fund15.50%16.60%
    ICICI Prudential Bluechip Fund10.81%8.48%
    16 more rows

    How much money can you have in the bank and still get the pension in Australia? ›

    If you get a full pension
    Your situationHomeownerNon-homeowner
    Single$280,000$504,500
    A couple, combined$419,000$643,500
    A couple, separated due to illness, combined$419,000$643,500
    A couple, one partner eligible, combined$419,000$643,500

    How much do I need to retire in Australia? ›

    The ASFA Retirement Standard Explainer says a comfortable retirement lifestyle would need $640,000 in super for a couple, or $545,000 for a single person.

    What are the 3 types of superannuation funds? ›

    Super fund categories. Most super funds fall into one of the following categories: retail, industry, public sector or corporate.

    Is AustralianSuper a good super fund? ›

    AustralianSuper has a total of 2.88 Million members and $258 billion in member assets as at 30 June 2022. Awards and ratings are only one factor to be taken into account when choosing a super fund. a) Finder Awards Best Rated Brand – Super Fund (Industry) winner 2020/2021 according to research conducted by Kantar.

    What is the average return on super? ›

    Over the past 29 years, Growth funds have returned 8.2% per year on average and the CPI has averaged 2.4% per year, giving a real return of 5.8%.
    ...
    Super fund performance: Calendar years (1993 to 2021)
    Calendar yearReturn (%)
    201914.7%
    20180.8%
    201710.8%
    20167.5%
    25 more rows
    19 Jul 2022

    Is hostplus still the best super fund? ›

    Hostplus – Balanced was the best performing fund in research firm SuperRatings' SR50 Balanced Index over both a one-year and 10-year investment period amid challenging and volatile investment conditions.

    Is it better to have a self managed super fund? ›

    SMSFs offer a wider range of investment options compared to other superannuation funds. With some limited exceptions, a SMSF can invest in virtually anything providing that this also meets the sole purpose test and adheres to the regulations. This includes investing in direct property.

    How much super do I need to retire at 60? ›

    ASFA estimates people who want a comfortable retirement need $640,000 for a couple, and $545,000 for a single person when they leave work, assuming they also receive a partial age pension from the federal government.

    How much super Should I have 50? ›

    So, what are the current average balances for different age groups?
    Average super balance by age2
    45 – 49$165,587$122,228
    50 – 54$214,795$157,124
    55 – 59$286,283$209,653
    60 – 64$359,870$289,179
    5 more rows
    1 Jul 2022

    Why is MySuper balance dropping? ›

    The negative superannuation returns most funds experienced in FY 2021/22 were largely caused by drops in the values of Australian and international shares. These sharemarket falls in turn were caused by factors including rising inflation, interest rate hikes and international events like the war in Ukraine.

    How much super do I need to retire at 65 in Australia? ›

    According to the Association of Superannuation Funds of Australia's Retirement Standard, to have a 'comfortable' retirement, single people will need $545,000 in retirement savings, and couples will need $640,000.

    How much super do I need to retire on 100k per year? ›

    It estimates that a couple hoping for a “comfortable” retirement will need $640,000 in savings and a single person will need $545,000. Super Consumers Australia has also run the numbers and estimates that a couple with a medium level of spending will need $402,000 and a single person will need $301,000.

    Is it better to invest in super or property? ›

    Key points. Keeping money in a high-growth super fund would have offered a better return than investing in property over the past 10 years. Property returns were more likely to be competitive with super in expensive neighbourhoods. Choosing property has intangible benefits, too, such as the security of home ownership.

    How is Hostplus performing? ›

    The Hostplus Balanced investment option has consistently outperformed the median return of the SuperRatings top 50 Balanced investment options. Net investment returns per annum. Period to 30 June 2021.

    Why is Hostplus good? ›

    It's so cheap because it invests your super in a mix of index funds (also known as exchange-traded funds) which simply track an index or market. So if low fees are your top priority, the Indexed Balanced fund offered by HostPlus is one of the lowest-fee options available for your super.

    What does the Barefoot Investor say about super? ›

    The Barefoot Investor is urging Australians to put more into their superannuation with cost of living pressures expected to worsen. Retirees living on their own need to have $46,494 a year set aside to at least live comfortably, with the elderly copping the biggest jump in expenses in more than a decade.

    Do you pay tax on a self managed super fund? ›

    The income of your SMSF is generally taxed at a concessional rate of 15%. To be entitled to this rate, your fund has to be a 'complying fund' that follows the laws and rules for SMSFs. For a non-complying fund the rate is the highest marginal tax rate.

    What are the risks of a self managed super fund? ›

    There are a number of trigger events that may lead to needing to exit an SMSF in the future - these include:
    • a trustee becoming a disqualified person.
    • non-residency.
    • loss of capacity.
    • lack of interest.
    • relationship breakdown between fund members.
    • death of a member.
    • special estate planning needs.

    What are the pros and cons of a self managed super fund? ›

    Here are just a few of the advantages of a self-managed super fund.
    • #1. Control.
    • #2. Quicker decision making.
    • #3. Lower costs for bigger funds.
    • #1. Time-consuming.
    • #2. Financial & legal risks in decision making.
    • #3. Inability to access government compensation schemes.
    • #4. Reduced access to dispute resolution bodies.
    • #1.

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